Eco Tourism Harming Whales Dolphins 2

Is eco-tourism harming whales and dolphins? Animal spotting tours are ‘stressing’ marine mammals

Story in the Daily Mail picking up on reports that dolphin watching and whale watching tours are causing stress and disturbance to the animals. The key message if you want to see them in the wild (which is the best place to do it), is either to watch from the shore, or to ensure the tour operator you go with follows proper guidelines. If you wish to swim with wild dolphins, we’d advise against it, but you can see guidelines here.
Not so green after all: Conservationists have warned that boat trips to watch whales and dolphins (stock image) might be stressing them out and putting their survival in jeopardy

For animal lovers, the chance to see majestic creatures such as whales in their natural habitat is often the high point of a holiday.

But conservationists have warned that boat trips to watch whales and dolphins might be stressing them out and putting their survival in jeopardy.

Minke whales off the coast of Iceland have been observed breathing heavily and speeding away from tourist boats, while populations of bottlenose dolphins in New Zealand on popular boat routes have plummeted.

Some experts think is because they are being driven from their preferred feeding grounds by well-meaning tourists eager to see their favourite animal.

Not so green after all: Conservationists have warned that boat trips to watch whales and dolphins (stock image) might be stressing them out and putting their survival in jeopardy

Boat trips have been considered an example of ‘friendly’ eco-tourism, but some routes are affecting cetacean behaviour and even causing deaths by collisions, conservationists at the International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC) in Glasgow, were told last week.

Scientists are most concerned about disruption causing marine animals to expend extra energy or failing to eat in their preferred areas, Nature reported.

David Lusseau of the University of Aberdeen showed that minke whales swimming in Faxaflói Bay in Iceland sped away from whale-watching boats.

Earlier this year he also reported that the whales breathed more heavily in the presence of a boat trip – just like they do when they are stressed and encounter a predator.

Minke whales off the coast of Iceland have been observed upping their speed and breathing heavily when boats came near - indicating stress. A stock image of the whales in Antarctica is pictured

Minke whales off the coast of Iceland have been observed upping their speed and breathing heavily when boats came near – indicating stress. A stock image of the whales in Antarctica is pictured

THE VALUE OF BOAT TRIPS

Many people may think – why not stop eco-tourism boat trips all together?

But they offer jobs to locals who may traditionally have hunted the animals.

Such trips also spread an important message of conservation. By attracting tourists, they also become a valuable commodity to be kept safe.

The number of people taking eco-tourism boat trips is thought to be around 13 million across 119 countries.

The 2008 figure shows a massive rise in popularity compared with 1991, when four million people in 31 countries took the trips.

In 2008, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, estimated the eco-tourism industry was worth a staggering $2.1 billion (£1.3bn).

While a new study will note that numbers of whales have not been affected by boat trips in the area, Dr Lusseau has shown that similar trips have led to depleted bottlenose dolphin populations in Doubtful Sound, New Zealand.

He fears the animals could become extinct in a matter of decades, as they appear to be driven away from feeding grounds by the tourist boats.

In order to tackle the problem, Dr Lusseau thinks scientists must work out which populations are most at risk, by looking at the short-term effects of eco-tourism and modelling them over long periods.

This way, they could separate adaptations from long-term threats.

He thinks that measures such as minimum distances between animals and boats could help, if they are standardised and enforced.

Some scientists are concerned that eco-tourism trips are killing animals one at a time and say that boat trips could prove to be the nail in the coffin for struggling species that have previously been threatened by hunting.

Bottlenose dolphins could become extinct in a matter of decades in Doubtful Sound, New Zealand (mapped) as they appear to be driven away from feeding grounds by the tourist boats, experts said

Dr Lusseau has shown that eco-tourism boat trips have led to depleted bottlenose dolphin populations in Doubtful Sound, New Zealand. A stock image of bottlenose dolphins is pictured

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